News 2024
Celebrate DNA Day on April 25
04/21
April 22 is Earth Day
04/18
Spring Newsletter Published
04/16
Paper Published: Folding paper models of biostructures for outreach and education
04/14
Register Now for a Webinar on Understanding PDB Validation: Which experimental structures should I rely on?
04/09
Video: Immunology and Cancer
04/02
Register Now for a Virtual Deep Dive into Computed Structure Model Exploration at RCSB.org
04/01
Explore Mechanism and Catalytic Site Annotations
03/31
Take the EDMAPS.rcsb.org Survey
03/29
Education Corner: Bringing Proteins to Life
03/26
Register for the April 1 Mol* Virtual Office Hour
03/24
March 24 is World TB Day
03/21
Meet RCSB PDB at the #DiscoverBMB Meeting
03/20
Paper Published: Visualizing groups of PDB structures and CSMs
03/17
March 11-17: Brain Awareness Week
03/11
Poster Prize Awarded at The Biophysical Society Meeting
03/06
March 4 is International HPV Awareness Day
02/29
February 29 is Rare Disease Day
02/27
Register for the March 28 Office Hour to Ask A Biocurator
02/25
PDB-101 Focus: Peak Performance
02/16
Use a Python Package to Access the RCSB PDB Search API
02/12
Molecular Valentines
02/11
Meet RCSB PDB at The Biophysical Society Meeting
02/06
February 4 is World Cancer Day
02/01
Register for VIZBI 2024 (March 13–15)
01/30
Notice: NGL Viewer Deprecation
01/30
Prizes Awarded at The Biophysical Society Japan Meeting
01/28
Take the CSM User Survey and Win
01/24
Register for the February 13 Mol* Webinar
01/19
Undergrads: Spend your summer with RCSB PDB
01/18
Register for the February 5 RCSB.org Office Hour
01/16
Celebrate #NationalMilkDay
01/10
Winter Newsletter Published
01/08
Applications Open for Director
01/07
Top Molecules of the Month in 2023
01/04

PDB-101 Focus: Peak Performance

02/16 

Since 2014, PDB-101 has focused on different topics to help build a collection molecular stories around a particular theme, Past topics have included cancer and diabetes.

In 2024, PDB-101 will highlight the structural stories of Peak Performance: the structural biology of athletics and well-being.

Athletes require bodies that are the best that is possible, all the way from molecules to muscles. By understanding the structure and function of our molecules, athletes can ensure that they are performing at their peak. This knowledge also informs the ways that we all can live our best lives, at all stages of our lives.

Visit the PDB-101 Browser for more.

<I>Anabolic steroids like testosterone (blue) are among the most common performance-enhancing drugs. They have two major functions: controlling development and maintenance of “male” characteristics and regulating anabolic processes such as synthesis of proteins in muscle cells and formation of oxygen-carrying red blood cells. In the early 1960s, weightlifters and bodybuilders discovered that anabolic steroids improved performance in aerobic and endurance sports. Since then, these compounds have been used (and misused) by amateur and professional athletes. In 1975, the International Olympic Committee placed steroids on their list of banned substances, and most professional sports organizations currently ban their use. The sex hormone-binding globulin, shown here, transports testosterone in the blood from the testes to other tissues.</I>Anabolic steroids like testosterone (blue) are among the most common performance-enhancing drugs. They have two major functions: controlling development and maintenance of “male” characteristics and regulating anabolic processes such as synthesis of proteins in muscle cells and formation of oxygen-carrying red blood cells. In the early 1960s, weightlifters and bodybuilders discovered that anabolic steroids improved performance in aerobic and endurance sports. Since then, these compounds have been used (and misused) by amateur and professional athletes. In 1975, the International Olympic Committee placed steroids on their list of banned substances, and most professional sports organizations currently ban their use. The sex hormone-binding globulin, shown here, transports testosterone in the blood from the testes to other tissues.


Past news and events have been reported at the RCSB PDB website and past Newsletters.